Cameroon Touristic Sites

Mount Cameroon

Mount Cameroon is one of Africa’s largest volcanoes, rising to 4,040 metres (13,255 ft) above the coast of west Cameroon. It rises from the coast through tropical rainforest to a bare summit which is cold, windy, and occasionally dusted with snow. The massive steep-sided volcano of dominantly basaltic-to-trachybasaltic composition forms a volcanic horst constructed above a basement of Precambrian metamorphic rocks covered with Cretaceous to Quaternary sediments. More than 100 small cinder cones, often fissure-controlled parallel to the long axis of the massive 1,400-cubic-kilometre (336 cu mi) volcano, occur on the flanks and surrounding lowlands. A large satellitic peak, Etinde (also known as Little Mount Cameroon), is located on the southern flank near the coast. Mount Cameroon has the most frequent eruptions of any West African volcano.

The first written account of volcanic activity could be the one from the Carthaginian Hanno the Navigator, who might have observed the mountain in the 5th century BC. Moderate explosive and effusive eruptions have occurred throughout history from both summit and flank vents. A 1922 eruption on the southwestern flank produced a lava flow that reached the Atlantic coast, and a lava flow from a 1999 south-flank eruption stopped only 200 m (660 ft) from the sea, cutting the coastal highway.

The first written account of volcanic activity could be the one from the Carthaginian Hanno the Navigator, who might have observed the mountain in the 5th century BC. Moderate explosive and effusive eruptions have occurred throughout history from both summit and flank vents. A 1922 eruption on the southwestern flank produced a lava flow that reached the Atlantic coast, and a lava flow from a 1999 south-flank eruption stopped only 200 m (660 ft) from the sea, cutting the coastal highway.

Book a tour now to visit this wonderful mountain

Korup National Park

The Korup National Park is in the Southwest Province of Cameroon between in ahaus N and 8°42’ to 9°16’ E. It is 50 km inland from the Bight of Biafra, 20 km from the edge of the mangrove swamps of the Rio Del Rey estuary and partially borders Nigeria. It extends over 1,260 km2 of mainly lowland rainforest and is adjacent to the Ejagham Forest Reserve to the north and the Oban Hills Division of Nigeria’s Cross River National Park to the west. Near but not contiguous to the park are the Rumpi Hills and Nta Ali Forest Reserves.

The area was originally set aside as a forest reserve in 1937. In 1986, Korup was declared a national park by Presidential Decree No.86-1283 after a ten-year campaign led by Dr. J Stephen Gartlan, Phil Agland and the Earthlife Foundation. Phil Agland’s award-winning film Korup: An African Rainforest, broadcast on British Television in November 1982 and subsequently around the world, brought the ecology of Korup to an international audience and spearheaded the campaign that was to secure the first British Government contribution of £440,000 through the ODA to rainforest conservation in 1986. In 1987, the Korup Project, an internationally funded integrated conservation and development project, provided support to the newly established park.

The Korup Project area included a support zone and the forest reserves of Ejagham, Nta Ali and Rumpi Hills. In 2003, the Korup Project ended, leaving the Korup National Park management with little to no financial and logistical support. This affected the park management’s ability to efficiently protect the wildlife from illegal hunting. As of 2006 however, Korup National Park is one of the three focus areas of the “Program of Sustainable Management of Natural Resources – South-West Province” (PSMNR-SWP), a bilateral cooperation between the Governments of Cameroon and Germany. With the renewed attention and support granted to Korup National Park, anti-poaching patrols have been becoming regular once again. As a partner in PSMNR-SWP, WWF-Cameroon has an advisory role on conservation and environmental education in Korup region, while the German Development Service (DED) oversees rural sustainable development activities.

Limber Wildlife Centre

During the early 1990s, Pandrillus Co-Founders Peter Jenkins and Liza Gadsby conducted a drill survey across western Cameroon. Their fieldwork took them to remote wild areas and villages in several provinces, and they frequently encountered chimpanzees – some chained on the roadside in the middle of nowhere, others locked in chicken coops or dark storerooms in villages and others caged in the yards of expensive private homes or noisy garden bars in upscale hotels in the capital. The luckiest had a chimpanzee companion but these were rare – most were desperately lonely solitaries – hungry, cold, thirsty, often sick or injured and bored in horrendous filth. Yet they had something else in common: when you looked in their eyes, they still had hope.

During the early 1990s, Pandrillus Co-Founders Peter Jenkins and Liza Gadsby conducted a drill survey across western Cameroon. Their fieldwork took them to remote wild areas and villages in several provinces, and they frequently encountered chimpanzees – some chained on the roadside in the middle of nowhere, others locked in chicken coops or dark storerooms in villages and others caged in the yards of expensive private homes or noisy garden bars in upscale hotels in the capital. The luckiest had a chimpanzee companion but these were rare – most were desperately lonely solitaries – hungry, cold, thirsty, often sick or injured and bored in horrendous filth. Yet they had something else in common: when you looked in their eyes, they still had hope.

After several meetings between Pandrillus and the Government of Cameroon and visits to various locations, it was decided that the old Victoria Zoo would be an ideal location for a wildlife sanctuary.

At the time, Victoria ZooSuzi_suzanne housed 3 drills; the hairless but cheerful chimpanzee Suzanne; an adult male mandrill living in the steel crate he arrived in 3 years prior; 3 baboons; and mona, putty-nose, Preuss’ and tantalus monkeys; and 2 red-capped mangabeys. All primates except the crated mandrill were nailed into wire battery cages about a meter square. Victoria Zoo was also home to some reptiles, duikers, birds and small carnivores. There were old lion cages and other enclosures, rusty and empty, but still serviceable.

It took the them less than 10 minutes to transfer the adult male mandrill into the empty lion cage; his subsequent smile lit up the whole zoo and inspired all of us to improve the lives of every animal.The old zoo had beautiful grounds, full time water and electric supply, and loads of potential. Limbe was a popular town and weekend destination for Cameroonians. Here was the rescue center that was so desperately needed, and in a partnership between the Government of Cameroon and Pandrillus, Limbe Wildlife Centre was born in 1993.

Slave Trade Market Bimbia

The town of Limbe is just endowed with lavished tourism potentials with historical tourism being one of its greatest attractions. Slave trade may have come and gone but relics of this callous activity which saw the buying and selling of human beings like commodities can still be spotted in the old time classic town of Limbe precisely in the village of Bimbia. Though in ruins, this over a century old slave market still has vestiges that can be used to tell the story to future

generations. The “door of no return” still stands tall as no slave returned after passing through it. Another site worth a stop around the area is the first ever Baptist church built by Alfred Saker and the “Camp Bimbia” which served as the missionary’s home.

Ancient German Heritage sites

We find in Cameroon, sites that are indispensable to its history. Of these sites are Ancient German Heritage Sites.
These sites were constructed by Germans in the late 19th century

Our Lady of Grace Shrine Sasse

Our Lady of Grace Shrine is a serene place, open to all. It is located in Mevio Sasse in the South West Region of Cameroon. This place serves as a pilgrimage ground. With the water fall creating a beautiful scenery, garden and chapels, it is an idle place to all who seek to meet God and find peace. It is a divine gift of nature to man, a quiet place to search the depth of our hearts in profound meditation and a solemn place to encounter God

Lake Barombi

Lake Barombi Mbo or Barombi-ma-Mbu is a lake near Kumba in the Southwest Region of Cameroon. It is located in the Cameroon volcanic chain, and is the largest volcanic lake in this region. It is one of the oldest radiocarbon-dated lakes in Africa. On old colonial maps the area was known as Elefanten Sea (Elephant Lake), but the elephants living in the area were extirpated due to ivory trading.

Until now, 15 species of fishes have been recorded from the lake. Among others, this includes Labeobarbus batesii, a member of the Fundulopanchax mirabilis group, and the endemic catfish Clarias maclareni. Perhaps most noteworthy are the 11 species of cichlids that are endemic to the lake (Konia spp., Stomatepia spp., Myaka myaka, Pungu maclareni, Sarotherodon caroli, S. linnellii, S. lohbergeri, and S. steinbachi). These cichlids are commonly recognized as a prime example of sympatric speciation,but studies indicate that they were not the result of a single founding event.
All the endemic fish are seriously threatened by pollution and sedimentation from human activities. They are potentially also threatened by large emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the lake’s bottom (compare Lake Nyos),although studies indicate that Barombo Mbo lacks excess amounts of this gas. Commercial fishing is forbidden in the lake. Additionally, the lake has an endemic species of sponge (Corvospongilla thysi), and an endemic species of shrimp (Caridina sp.).

The Twin Lakes of Muanengouba

The twin Lakes of Muanenguba are a pair of crater lakes on Mount Muanenguba located in Bangem – Kupe Muanenguba subdivision in the South West region of Cameroon. Rolling hills, lush vegetation and friendly inhabitants from the Bakossi tribe make for an unforgetable experience.

These lakes hold a strong cultural significance for the indigineous people here. Shaped in the form of an African map, one of the lakes is believed to be female (blue), the other male (green).

Menchum Fall

The Menchum, Donga and Katsina Ala rivers all flow west from the Northeast Region to join the Benue in Nigeria. The Menchum drains the Oku-Kom highlands, which have an elevation of 2,400 metres (7,900 ft) around Lake Oku, falling to about 800 metres (2,600 ft) at Mbonkissu to the west of Fundong. The highlands, formed by volcanic action, have been dissected by steep valleys carved out by fast-flowing streams.

The Menchum Falls, about 20 km south of Wum and 30 km north of Bafut, are impressive and a potential tourist attraction. However, the access road is very rough, and the viewing site is not well maintained. A 2003 guide stated that the road was virtually impassable in the rainy season. On 7 September 2009, Agreenergy and the Government of Cameroon signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a project to build a dam and 90MW hydroelectric power plant on the river. Apart from bringing electricity and jobs, the project would involve surfacing the road. On 8 December 2010 President Paul Biya announced plans to construct a dam on the Menchum Falls.